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The Airway Meeting 2014 presentation slides

Courtesy of Monash Anaesthesia

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What if? Teamwork in Emergency Airway Management

PHARM PODCAST 110 : Glidescope – how a vascular surgeon improved airway care forever

 

Image from Twitter. No financial disclosures

Image from Twitter. No financial disclosures

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The Bind When It Comes to a Binder (Part 3)

Originally posted on The Collective:

There’s been a lot of stimulating discussion after parts 1 and 2 of this series from Dr Alan Garner (you can check those here and here). Here’s part 3. 

Thanks for sticking with the discussion so far. In part 2 we had a look at AP compression injuries and lateral compression injuries. Short summary is binders make sense and there is some observational evidence of benefit in AP compression injuries. However in lateral compression, binders make no biomechanical sense and there is definite evidence they increase fracture displacement both in cadavers and real live trauma patients.

The final group that we have not yet considered in the Young and Burgess classification is the vertical shear group. These patients are complex because the injuries are both horizontally and vertically unstable. You will see what I mean if you have a look at this Xray:

Pelvic Xray copy

Is putting a binder around the…

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Martin Bromiley awarded Difficult Airway Society medal

THE MASTER


8 years ago I met Dr Levitan and read his seminal book on emergency airway management. It was like a light was turned on in a dark room. Since then, with his teachings I have NEVER failed an intubation/airway to date. A living legend of Emergency medicine and airway management

You are what you eat

EDIBLE CRICOTHYROTOMY MODEL from Rob Bryant on Vimeo.

Fluid resuscitation in bleeding trauma patient: are you aware of wich is the right fluid and the right strategy?

Originally posted on MEDEST:

DCR copy

The fluids of choice in prehospital field are, in most cases, cristalloids (Norma Saline or Lactate Ringer).

But what is the physiological impact of saline solutions when administered in large amounts (as the latest ATLS guidelines indicates) to hypotensive trauma patients?

Is aggressive Fluid resuscitation the right strategy to be pursued?

The triad of post-trauma lethal evolution is:

  • Hypotermia
  • Acidosis
  • Coagulopathy

Aggressive fluid resuscitation with cristalloids, and saline solutions in particular, can be detrimental in many ways:

  1. Cristalloids tend to displace the already formed clots and improves bleeding
  2. Normal Saline produce hypercloremic acidosis worsening coagulation and precipitating renal and immune dysfunction
  3. Cristalloids diluts the coagulation factors and precipitate the coagulation system (dilution coagulopathy)
  4. Cristalloids rapidilly shift in intercellular space worsening SIRS process and interstitial edema (brain edema, bowel wall edema) with consequent compartment hypertension

So wich is the perfect fluid to infuse in trauma?

The perfect fluid doesn’t exists.

Balanced saline…

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PHARM PODCAST 109 : NORTHERN PHARM

 

This is the King Air 200 that’s based in Inuvik NT

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Bringing the ED to the patient!

PHARM PODCAST 108 : ARISE Hangout

ARISE trial discussed!

ARISE trial discussed!

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Scalpel Finger Bougie -Life Saving Art

Credit to Dr Tor Ercleve for art work and Dr Natasha Pirie-Burley for original design concept. Special mention to Dr Scott Weingart for inspiration. This logo design is distributed under Creative Commons Licence. FOAM to improve surgical airway training!

Credit to Dr Tor Ercleve for art work and Dr Natasha Pirie-Burley for original design concept. Special mention to Dr Scott Weingart for inspiration. This logo design is distributed under Creative Commons Licence.
FOAM to improve surgical airway training!

Scary Little Creatures

Originally posted on The Collective:

Dr Andrew Weatherall does prehospital doctor stuff but spends lots of time serving the somnolent god of anaesthesia  in a tertiary paediatric hospital. He has particular interests in cardiac, thoracic, trauma and liver transplant anaesthesia and is trying to be a PhD student in his spare time.  You can also find him as @doc_andy_w 

Little creatures have the potential to cause significant stress. It’s true of spiders. It’s true of parasites. And for many medicos, it’s true of paediatric patients. All too often, the experienced clinician confronted with the alien life-form of a kid goes through a rapid medical devolution, retreating to the almost foetal uselessness of a medical student confronted for the first time by having to do a procedure they’ve only read about.

Dance all you like tiny peacock spider, still wary. [via Jurgen Otto on Flickr under "Some Rights Reserved CC licence 2.0]

Dance all you like tiny peacock spider, still wary. [via Jurgen Otto on Flickr under "Some Rights Reserved CC licence 2.0]

It’s entirely reasonable to feel less…

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Bougie aided video assisted intubation through King Laryngeal Tube

Originally posted on MEDEST:

If you have a patient with a King LT in place and want to intubate him use the Bougie and the videolaryngoscope. It works perfectly.

Here is the video tutorial.

Logo MEDEST2

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SMACC CHICAGO ! Register in 7 days !

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Dr Brian Burns shows that even other conferences recommend SMACC CHICAGO ! He is presenting here at Rural Medicine Australia 2014 in Sydney. Tweeted photo courtesy of @FlyTexan

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