When an anaesthetist asks for help from an intensivist – Human Factors My Story

Stay calm and use your scalpel
Stay calm and use your scalpel by Dr Brian Burns

Hi folks. Read a lot. Read widely. As Scott Weingart said at SMACC 2013 : ” Jump into river and try to drink it all!”

Here is a useful case study I found during my weekly reading. Good stuff can be found as long as you look and keep motivated too!

It comes from a great FOAMEd site called the Clinical Human Factors Group, headed my Martin Bromiley. Check out the rest of the site. They are doing good things and trying to make a difference…for us all.

HUMAN FACTORS – MY STORY

Take home lessons

  1. What may seem obvious, is not necessarily so
  2. Never be afraid to ask for advice or a second opinion, even if the situation seems dire
  3. Right main stem bronchial intubation can look exactly like a tension pneumothorax
  4. Its not about us, its about the patient
  5. Cross disciplinary communication and training can improve performance and care

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