PHARM Podcast 76 Ketamine MythBusters Part 2 – Take the pressure down

bioniche_ketamine

Tonight on the podcast , we bust another long term medical myth. This is Part 2 of the Ketamine Mythbusters series . This episode , we cover the haemodynamic effects of ketamine. Does it cause dangerous tachycardia and hypertension? How useful is it in the haemodynamically unstable patient?

Show note references:

  1. Ketamine: a review
  2. Haemodynamic response to induction of anaesthesia with ketamine/midazolam
  3. Pharmacokinetics and haemodynamics of ketamine in intensive care patients with brain or spinal cord injury
  4. Adverse cardiovascular effects of ketamine infusion in patients with catecholamine-dependent heart failure
  5. Ketamine for emergency anaesthesia at very high altitude(4243 m above sea-level)*
  6. Hemodynamic consequences of ketamine vs etomidate for endotracheal intubation in the air medical setting.

Now on to the AudioPodcast ( available here and on iTunes)

Right Click and Choose Save-as to Download the Podcast.

7 thoughts on “PHARM Podcast 76 Ketamine MythBusters Part 2 – Take the pressure down”

  1. Hi Minh

    Enjoyed the podcast – short n sweet. Looking forward to the third instalment re: neuropsych issues with ketamine. Interesting case recently by colleague, details of which cannot share locally but may give you a call about. K worked well

    Just thinking – no mention of benefits of ketamine as induction agent in asthma?

    http://www.courts.sa.gov.au/CoronersFindings/Lists/Coroners%20Findings/Attachments/325/GORDON%20Sally%20Anne.pdf

    Thoughts? it’s my ‘go to’ for the dreaded asthma intubation….

    1. thanks Tim. yep appreciate the feedback. Medstar and Rural and Remote MH SA seem to be cautiously optimistic with their ketamine protocol.

      as for asthma..actually not much evidence so might even be a mythbuster xtra episode ! Anecdotally yes it seems to work..sometimes!

  2. Hi minh,
    Great podcast. On the myocardial depression area….what is the australian agent you would use for patients with poor inotropy? I had believed ketamine would have still been the best of a bad lot, and less of a negative inotrope then, say, propofol

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