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Examining the Hairs on the Yak – A Good Chance for More Chat

Originally posted on The Collective:

One of the good things about research that has its own issues, is that there is lots of scope to learn from the things about it that are good, as well as those that aren’t so great. The nice thing about ongoing comment is it gives even more chances to explain why a researcher might make certain choices along the way. Every question in research has more than one way of approaching some answers. Dr Alan Garner returns to provide even more background on this particular study, which has already generated some interesting conversation and a follow-up post

It’s an excellent thing to be able to keep having discussion around the challenges related to both conducting and interpreting a trial.  These things always bring up so many valuable questions, which deserve a response. So this is not going to be quick, but I hope you’ll have a read.

Lots…

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Same, same? Actually different

Originally posted on The Collective:

More of the operational data from the Head Injury Retrieval Trial has just been published. By luck more than anything else this has occurred within 24 hours of the publication of the main trial results which you can find here.

Some operational data about systems used in the trial has already been published. A key part of HIRT was a dispatch system where the operational crew were able to view screens with case information as they were logged to spot patients who may have severe enough injuries to warrant advanced care. They could then use the available information or call the initiating number for further details. If the available information matched the criteria for consideration of an advanced care team, the randomisation process then swung into action. The whole idea was to streamline the process of activation of an advanced care team to severely injured patients.

A study looking…

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HIRT – Studying a Non-Standard System that Ended up as Standard

Originally posted on The Collective:

There’s always a bit of extra reflection you can’t include in the discussion of a research paper. Dr Alan Garner reflects more on some of the challenges of doing research in prehospital medicine. 

The main results of the Head Injury Retrieval Trial have now been published on-line in Emergency Medicine Journal. We have paid the open access fees so that the results are freely available to everyone in the spirit of FOAM. This was an important study that was eagerly awaited by many clinicians around the world.

The summary from my point of view as the chief investigator: an enormous opportunity wasted.

It is now nearly ten years since we commenced recruiting for the trial in May 2005. Significant achievements include obtaining funding for a trial that was ultimately to cost 20 million Australian Dollars to run. I am not aware of another prehospital trial that has come anywhere close to this…

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RSI Basics Podcast with Minh Le Cong (@ketaminh on twitter)

Originally posted on DOWNSTAIRS CARE OUT THERE BLOG:

A Podcast with Minh Le Cong on beginner RSI. Recorded for my own personal reference but its such a great resource for Paramedics, Paramedic Students and a good all round touch up on the subject with a person much more knowledgeable than I.

pharm-logo-1400x1400
If your not listening to Minh I highly suggest you start! His podcast was my first step into #FOAMed, so its an absolute honor to have him on my own.

You can find the Podcast over on I-Tunes:  https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/downstairs-care-outthere-podcast/id876296199c (please take time to leave a review or rating!!)

Below you will find some of the papers, trial and websites that we mention throughout, all are a good read. There’s also a number of different checklist ideas.

PHARM Podcast 61:
http://prehospitalmed.com/2013/02/19/pharm-podcast-61-rapid-sequence-intubation/

The Original RSII Article;

http://journals.lww.com/anesthesia-analgesia/Citation/1970/07000/Rapid_Induction_Intubation_for_Prevention_of.27.aspx

The study protocol for the Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT): a single centre randomised controlled trial of physician prehospital management of severe…

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A Bit About Paeds Trauma for Those Who Do A Bit of Trauma

Originally posted on The Collective:

This is a post put together by Dr Andrew Weatherall as background preparation for a talk at the SPANZA Paeds Update from March 14, 2015. This is an update for the occasional paeds anaesthetist. It’s not about covering it all but hopefully there’s a few useful points in there to prompt a little thought and discussion.

For lots of people who do a bit of paediatric care, there’s a bit of nervousness around little people. It’s a bit disproportionate to the numbers of actual cases of course because paeds trauma is not common. In fact, rates are slowly going down.

There is also a common paediatric conundrum to deal with – what do you do with adult evidence? This is because overwhelmingly trauma literature deals in the bigger, smellier version of Homo sapiens.

So the challenge is to provide a refresher on something that is getting less common for…

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Inter Hospital Transfer

Originally posted on DOWNSTAIRS CARE OUT THERE BLOG:

wpid-20150111_130054.jpg

Not much research has been done in this area relating to interhospital transport, but a lot of good practice from the hospital can apply to us. You obviously have fews sedating medications available but the principle remains the same.

Take your safety into account and if your concerned raise it with your partner, the sending and receiving hospitals.

It takes a few minutes to sort out any issues and can prevent a major mishap further down the road.

All view and opinions are my own, always observe local protocols and procedures.

Work Hard and be good to your patients!

What to read;

ABC’s Transfer and Retrieval Medicine; Chapter 42, Acute Behavioural Disturbance M. Le Cong

ABC’s Prehospital Emergency Medicine; Chapter 4, Scene Safety V. Calland & P. Williams

What evidence exists about the safety of physical restraint when used by law enforcement and medical staff to control individuals with acute…

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Let’s be clear! Not all trauma patients must be treated with spinal immobilization during prehospital resuscitation and transport.

Originally posted on MEDEST:

ems-backboardsSpinal immobilization is performed in all trauma patients from the rescuers in EMS systems all over the world, regardless the mechanism of injury and the clinical signs.
This kind of approach is nowadays been rebutted from the recents evidences and the actual guidelines.
ACEP, in Jan 2015, released a policy statement entitled :”EMS Management of Patients with Potential Spinal Injury” clarifying the right indications, and contraindications, for spinal immobilization in prehospital setting.
The lack of evidence of beneficial use of devices such as spinal backboards, cervical collars etc… is in contrast with the demonstrated detrimental effects of such instruments: airway compromise, respiratory impairment, aspiration, tissue ischemia,increased intracranial pressure, and pain, consequent to spinal immobilization tools, can result in increased use of diagnostic imaging and mortality.

Already in 2009 a Cochrane review demonstrated the lack of evidences on use of spinal restriction strategies in trauma.

Recently the out of hospital validation…

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Immediate care at the community level

Originally posted on DOWNSTAIRS CARE OUT THERE BLOG:

I want to talk about getting your community involved in CPR Programs and CPR education. Often I hear people, friend, family, acquaintances, bystanders talking about CPR, often I hear “I couldn’t do CPR I haven’t done a course”

Ambulance Computer aided dispatch has been providing CPR instruction over the phone for years, once a Cardiac or respiratory arrest is identified by information given by the caller a prompt is delivered to the call taker scripting providing  CPR instruction to the caller, after establishing the ability of the person to perform CPR instruction is given for 100 beats per minute with no “rescue breaths”

CPR is an easy skill to provide a passing understanding of to the general public.

I can do the shopping centre version in under two minutes with a short practice.

1; Make a W start at the top and bottom of the sternum

2: Press at the…

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Caring for the ‘invisible wounds': – A former Paramedic’s mission to help build Resilience in the lives of Emergency workers.

A Bit of New Evidence on Drowning

Originally posted on The Collective:

An opportunity for a quick post to point to a new publication with something useful on drowning. From Dr Alan Garner.

Unfortunately we attend a number of paediatric drownings in the Sydney area every year. Many recover well. Some do not. Some do unexpectedly well. We have had a patient who was GCS 3 at our arrival and asystolic on the monitor make a full recovery. Most children in this situation however either die or are severely impaired.

This brings us to a vital question – when is it reasonable to stop resuscitation? Well, here’s some evidence to help inform the chat.

The Dutch Study

Over at the BMJ a new paper has just hit the screen:

Outcome after resuscitation beyond 30 minutes in drowned children with cardiac arrest and hypothermia: Dutch nationwide retrospective cohort study. 

This study is a nationwide observational study in the Netherlands of children with cardiac arrest…

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The Bind About Pelvic Binders – Part 4

Originally posted on The Collective:

Is this the last bit for now? Dr Alan Garner following up on pelvic binders after all the stimulating comments. If you haven’t already, check out part 1, part 2 and part 3.

During the writing of part three of this series on pelvic fractures and particularly after reading Julian Cooper’s comments (thank you Julian) I realised that the observational data around pelvic binders does not entirely fit with the theories. Let’s start with the theory and I might directly borrow Julian’s comments from Part 2 as he says it better than I could:

“In any type of pelvic injury. the bleeding will be either:

  1. Venous or bone ends: in which case keeping things still with a binder is likely to allow clot formation (low pressure bleeding, low or high flow).
  2. “Slow” arterial (the sort of thing seen as a blush on contrast CT) which will probably trickle on…

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Episode 24 – Mild Traumatic Brain Injury/Concussion

Originally posted on FOAMcast:

(ITUNES OR LISTEN HERE)

The Free Open Access Medical Education (FOAM)

We cover the Taming the SRU podcast, “Ketamine Cagematch” (iTunes), a debate between Dr. Minh Le Cong and Dr. Chris Zammit.

Dogma persists that ketamine may increase intracranial pressure, which would be bad in traumatic brain injury (TBI) given the fixed space in the cranial vault.  These are largely from Yet, these patients often need sedation, for agitation or intubation, and drops in blood pressure are also deleterious (see EMCrit on neuroprotective intubation).

PRO (Le Cong): The literature doesn’t show clinically significant deleterious outcomes from ketamine use in the head injured patient.  Review in Annals on ketamine and ICP.  Deleterious effects of apnea may result from other sedative agents.

CON (Zammit): Studies showing that ketamine does not increase ICP confounded by the presence of other sedatives on board.  As…

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Revisiting Old Stories About Little Airways

Originally posted on The Collective:

Dr Andrew Weatherall returns to stuff about paediatric airways, a bit of a companion to an earlier post with some practical tips. 

There are some things you’re taught from a very young age to believe in. Then it turns out it’s just plain wrong. Santa Claus. The Tooth Fairy. The Public Holiday Numbat. (Well, the last one might be specific to my upbringing.)

And in medicine there are plenty of examples those too. Oxygen is always good. You can’t manage trauma without a cervical collar. Then of course there’s pretty much everything about the paediatric airway. As if managing kids didn’t come with challenges anyway, we all get to work with information that is just plain wrong.

And there’s no mistaking that clinicians find paediatric airways difficult. The staff from Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne have recently published a sizeable prospective study of emergency department intubations. This is from a big, clinically…

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Auckland HEMS Air Ambulance Fellows wanted!

Originally posted on Auckland HEMS:

Fellow – Adult Emergency Department-076540

Helicopter Emergency Medicine Service (HEMS)

Fellow position – 6 month fixed term (ACEM accredited special skill term in Air Ambulance)

June 2015 – December 2015

Auckland City Hospital is the largest public Hospital in New Zealand and one of the best trauma centres in the country .The Emergency department is a modern purpose built, world class facility that opened in 2003. We have an enthusiastic team of clinicians who have expertise in resuscitation, ultrasound, simulation, toxicology and retrieval medicine. The closely knit team consists of  FACEM’s, Medical officers and Resident Medical Officers. The department sees about 60,000 adult patients annually with a high patient acuity.

The department in conjunction with the Auckland Rescue Helicopter trust run the Helicopter Emergency Medical service (HEMS) which has been successful in providing fully integrated care for trauma patients. The department is also active in research and is currently involved…

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My favourite VL view to increase first pass intubation

Originally posted on MEDEST:

A debate is ongoing among #FOAMED social media about increasing first passage rate in tracheal intubation and some difficulties when using VL.

At the beginning of my experience with VL I experienced some difficulties, but with a radical change in technical approach I reached a good security on first pass success.

Here are my consideration and I hope will be useful for anyone is starting using VL

 

There are some fundamental differences in VL technique respect to DL, that makes the DL more easy and intuitive to pass the tube trough the cords.

3axysThe 3 axys theory for airway management

“Sniffing position” align the pharyngeal axis with the laryngeal one

Sniffing positionSniffing position

Perfoming Direct Laryngoscopy with the laryngoscope we align the mouth axis to have a direct view of the cords.

DL viewDL VIEW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This view coincide with the route…

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