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Posts from the ‘SMACCUS’ Category

SMACC THE ALBUM

 

 

JellyBean 032 with Ashley Liebig

Fear, Flight, Fight. Ashley Liebig is a Screaming Eagle. So at SMACC Chicago you had a 101st Airborne Division Medic talking about feelings. SMACC Star Ashley Liebig, now a Texan Flight Nurse rocked one of the Pre-SMACC US Workshops with a difficult subject, talking about dealing with critical events as a human inside a big…

http://lifeinthefastlane.com/jellybean-032-with-ashley-liebig/

The Resuscitationist Mindset: Bread Baking and OODA Loops – Scott Weingart

Scott Weingart’s lecture at SMACC-Chicago was on OODA loops and the supremacy of System I for resuscitation The post The Resuscitationist Mindset: Bread Baking and OODA Loops – Scott Weingart appeared first on Intensive Care Network.

http://intensivecarenetwork.com/resuscitationist-mindset-bread-baking-ooda-loops-scott-weingart/

“Hot Potato” – Retrieval of adult patient with airway complications in rural ED

Dr. Karel Habig of Sydney HEMS, leads a global panel in the discussion of the retrieval of patient with a difficult airway in a rural ED. The post “Hot Potato” – Retrieval of adult patient with airway complications in rural ED appeared first on Intensive Care Network.

http://intensivecarenetwork.com/hot-potato-retrieval-adult-patient-airway-complications-rural-ed/

Prehospital Medicine: How far we’ve come – Stefan Mazur — Intensive Care Network

Stefan Mazur highlights the fascinating history of Prehospital and Retrieval medicine from the battle field to present day. The post Prehospital Medicine: How far we’ve come – Stefan Mazur appeared first on Intensive Care Network.

via Prehospital Medicine: How far we’ve come – Stefan Mazur — Intensive Care Network

Prehospital Ketamine – Is there anything it can’t do? — Intensive Care Network

PHARM Physician, Per Bredmose, provides an in depth look at Ketamine in the prehospital setting The post Prehospital Ketamine – Is there anything it can’t do? appeared first on Intensive Care Network.

via Prehospital Ketamine – Is there anything it can’t do? — Intensive Care Network

AVALANCHE! – Daniel Kornhall — Intensive Care Network

Kornhall's discusses the cause of an avalanche, the Avalanche Survival Curve and what this means in relation to reducing avalanche deaths, current statistics and avalanche pre-hospital medicine. The post AVALANCHE! – Daniel Kornhall appeared first on Intensive Care Network.

via AVALANCHE! – Daniel Kornhall — Intensive Care Network

Team work, managing teams – Chris Hicks

Chris Hicks talk Making Teams Work challenges current training for high acuity events and emergency training processes, or lack there of.

Source: Team work, managing teams – Chris Hicks

Is There a Doctor on the Plane? – Joe Lex

Lisa McQueen turn a critical eye toward common pseudoaxioms in paediatrics. She may even debunk the notion that “children are not just little adults.”

Source: Is There a Doctor on the Plane? – Joe Lex

No X–ray, No Problem! – Casey Parker

Casey Parker educates us on how ultrasound can provide a faster, more accurate and compassionate care – regardless of where you work.

Source: No X–ray, No Problem! – Casey Parker

Cracking #smaccBYTE

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Own the Surgical Airway

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Shoes, Sex and Secrets by Ashley Liebig

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Bouncing Back from the Beach – Cutting to Air to secure an Emergency Surgical Airway – Thomas Dolven

Bouncing Back from the Beach – Cutting to Air to secure an Emergency Surgical Airway Summary by: Thomas Dolven To handle airways means being prepared to handle them all the way. You need to be prepared for a cannot intubate cannot oxygenate CICO scenario. The common, final end point of airway management in a is the emergency surgical airway, the cricothyroidotomy. So how to prepare? Often, it is not being taught right. This is a rare procedure under high stress and time sensitive. And most importantly, it is a bloody procedure that will be blind. You cannot use your eyes. So it needs a simple technique without fine motor skills, and it must be tactile. Your finger is the perfect tool for this task, and will guide you through it. The video of my personal real world experience is backed by available empirical evidence and lab training. There will never be an RCT, this is the best evidence we will have. So read NAPP4 and the case series article on the scalpel-finger-tube technique. Read these available articles, train, and remember these two key points: 1) There will be blood. But that’s OK, because. 2) Your finger can see.

Source: Bouncing Back from the Beach – Cutting to Air to secure an Emergency Surgical Airway – Thomas Dolven

The False STEMI – NonSTEMI Dichotomy: SMACC Chicago talk online!

Source: The False STEMI – NonSTEMI Dichotomy: SMACC Chicago talk online!