AiR: CMAC Videos | Greater Sydney Area HEMS

Since we started using the CMAC videolaryngoscope we have been collecting useful airway videos for education. You can find these videos on our Vimeo channel. All CMAC videos are shared under a Creative Commons Licence: Attribution 2.0 Generic. Please familiarise yourself with the terms of the licence before reusing our videos. To view our videos,…
— Read on sydneyhems.com/airway-registry/cmac-videos/

Video laryngoscopy does not improve the intubation outcomes in emergency and critical patients – a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials | Critical Care | Full Text

There is significant controversy regarding the influence of video laryngoscopy on the intubation outcomes in emergency and critical patients. This systematic review and meta-analysis was designed to determine whether video laryngoscopy could improve the intubation outcomes in emergency and critical patients. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, Embase, and Scopus databases from database inception until 15 February 2017. Only randomized controlled trials comparing video and direct laryngoscopy for tracheal intubation in emergency department, intensive care unit, and prehospital settings were selected. The primary outcome was the first-attempt success rate. Review Manager 5.3 software was used to perform the pooled analysis and assess the risk of bias for each eligible study. The GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system was used to assess the quality of evidence for all outcomes. Twelve studies (2583 patients) were included in the review for data extraction. Pooled analysis did not show an improved first-attempt success rate using video laryngoscopy (relative risk [RR], 0.93; P = 0.28; low-quality evidence). There was significant heterogeneity among studies (I 2 = 91%). Subgroup analyses showed that, in the prehospital setting, video laryngoscopy decreased the first-attempt success rate (RR, 0.57; P < 0.01; high-quality evidence) and overall success rate (RR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.48–0.69; moderate-quality evidence) by experienced operators, whereas in the in-hospital setting, no significant difference between two devices was identified for the first-attempt success rate (RR, 1.06; P = 0.14; moderate-quality evidence), regardless of the experience of the operators or the types of video laryngoscopes used (P > 0.05), although a slightly higher overall success rate was shown (RR, 1.11; P = 0.03; moderate-quality evidence). There were no differences between devices for other outcomes (P > 0.05), except for a lower rate of esophageal intubation (P = 0.01) and a higher rate of Cormack and Lehane grade 1 (P < 0.01) when using video laryngoscopy. On the basis of the results of this study, we conclude that, compared with direct laryngoscopy, video laryngoscopy does not improve intubation outcomes in emergency and critical patients. Prehospital intubation is even worsened by use of video laryngoscopy when performed by experienced operators.
— Read on ccforum.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13054-017-1885-9

Irukandji Syndrome – StatPearls – NCBI Bookshelf

Irukandji syndrome is a painful, potentially lethal condition caused by certain jellyfish from the Cubozoa class (box jellyfish) species. Although the sting is usually mild, systemic symptoms resembling a catecholamine surge can result in approximately half an hour, including tachycardia, hypertension, severe pain, muscle cramping, and is often followed by hypotension, pulmonary edema, and potentially life-threatening cardiac complications.[1]
— Read on www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK562264/

The use of magnesium sulphate and morphine vs. morphine-only in Irukandji syndrome: a retrospective review of ambulance data | Australasian Journal of Paramedicine

The use of magnesium sulphate and morphine vs. morphine-only in Irukandji syndrome: a retrospective review of ambulance data | Australasian Journal of Paramedicine
— Read on ajp.paramedics.org/index.php/ajp/article/view/711

Bush communities farewell renowned RFDS doctor Don Bowley OAM as he reflects on nearly 30 years of service – ABC News

Whether he was delivering babies in the middle of the bush or performing a procedure atop a pool table in a pub, Dr Don’s medical career has been nothing short of epic. 
— Read on www.abc.net.au/news/2023-01-22/doctor-don-bowley-rfds-outback/101858776

Dr Don Bowley – A Flying Doctor legend hangs up his wings after 3 decades of dedicated service to Outback

Dr Don Bowley , RFDS Mt Isa

Today marks the end of a 3 decade long aeromedical career for Dr Don Bowley , my mentor in Royal Flying Doctor Service . He finally retires after a long distinguished career providing prehospital & retrieval medicine as well as remote GP service to the folks of Outback Queensland . It was an honour serving under his leadership in Isa .

Facebook post from ABC North West with many farewells & messages of gratitude

Extreme medicine: What it’s like being a medic in the world’s most dangerous places

Extreme medicine: What it’s like being a medic in the world’s most dangerous places
— Read on www.readersdigest.co.uk/inspire/life/what-its-like-being-a-medic-in-the-worlds-most-extreme-places

Prehospital Release of Patients After Treatment in an Anesthesiologist-Staffed Mobile Emergency Care Unit

Prehospital Release of Patients After Treatment in an Anesthesiologist-Staffed Mobile Emergency Care Unit
— Read on www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9301518/

Association of Prehospital Plasma Transfusion With Survival in Trauma Patients With Hemorrhagic Shock When Transport Times Are Longer Than 20 Minutes

Association of Prehospital Plasma Transfusion With Survival in Trauma Patients With Hemorrhagic Shock When Transport Times Are Longer Than 20 Minutes
— Read on www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6990948/

Prehospital ultrasound-guided nerve blocks improve reduction-feasibility of dislocated extremity injuries compared to systemic analgesia. A randomized controlled trial | PLOS ONE

Prehospital ultrasound-guided nerve blocks improve reduction-feasibility of dislocated extremity injuries compared to systemic analgesia. A randomized controlled trial | PLOS ONE
— Read on journals.plos.org/plosone/article