Predictors of post-intubation hypotension in trauma patients following prehospital emergency anaesthesia: a multi-centre observational study | Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine | Full Text

Post-intubation hypotension (PIH) after prehospital emergency anaesthesia (PHEA) is prevalent and associated with increased mortality in trauma patients. The objective of this study was to compare the differential determinants of PIH in adult trauma patients undergoing PHEA. This multi-centre retrospective observational study was performed across three Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) in the UK. Consecutive sampling of trauma patients who underwent PHEA using a fentanyl, ketamine, rocuronium drug regime were included, 2015–2020. Hypotension was defined as a new systolic blood pressure (SBP) < 90 mmHg within 10 min of induction, or > 10% reduction if SBP was < 90 mmHg before induction. A purposeful selection logistic regression model was used to determine pre-PHEA variables associated with PIH. During the study period 21,848 patients were attended, and 1,583 trauma patients underwent PHEA. The final analysis included 998 patients. 218 (21.8%) patients had one or more episode(s) of hypotension ≤ 10 min of induction. Patients > 55 years old; pre-PHEA tachycardia; multi-system injuries; and intravenous crystalloid administration before arrival of the HEMS team were the variables significantly associated with PIH. Induction drug regimes in which fentanyl was omitted (0:1:1 and 0:0:1 (rocuronium-only)) were the determinants with the largest effect sizes associated with hypotension. The variables significantly associated with PIH only account for a small proportion of the observed outcome. Clinician gestalt and provider intuition is likely to be the strongest predictor of PIH, suggested by the choice of a reduced dose induction and/or the omission of fentanyl during the anaesthetic for patients perceived to be at highest risk.
— Read on sjtrem.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13049-023-01091-z

Preoxygenation with standard facemask combining apnoeic oxygenation using high flow nasal cannula versuss standard facemask alone in patients with and without obesity: the OPTIMASK international study – PMC

Preoxygenation with standard facemask combining apnoeic oxygenation using high flow nasal cannula versuss standard facemask alone in patients with and without obesity: the OPTIMASK international study – PMC
— Read on www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC10073359/

A novel technique of handling the blade for videolaryngoscopy intubation in patients with a semi-rigid neck collar: a prospective randomized controlled trial – PubMed

Our findings demonstrated a superior glottic view and more favorable intubation environments when the blade tip was placed under the epiglottis than when using the conventional Macintosh technique in cervical spine immobilized patients.
— Read on pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/36912005/

‘If the plane breaks down, it’s just you’: the pressure and awakening of one city GP in the outback | Australian books | The Guardian

Dr Sonia Henry was looking to escape her Sydney life when she signed up to work in remote hospitals. What she encountered was amazing beauty – and terrible suffering
— Read on amp.theguardian.com/books/2023/jun/03/if-the-plane-breaks-down-its-just-you-the-pressure-and-awakening-of-one-city-gp-in-the-outback