Dr James DuCanto with SALAD

our next patient: 42 year old male; alcoholic liver disease; unwell for several days; lethargic/confused; jaundiced; tense ascitic abdomen. The patient starts to vomit fresh red blood, initially a few cupfuls, then profuse and unrelenting. They’re choking and unable to protect their own airway; sats dip to 88%; RR goes up to 32. Normal suctioningContinue reading “Dr James DuCanto with SALAD”

EMCrit 300 – Airway Continuous Quality Improvement and the Resus Airway Bundle — EMCrit Project

If you are not measuring your success, it probably is not that great EMCrit Project by Scott Weingart, MD FCCM. EMCrit 300 – Airway Continuous Quality Improvement and the Resus Airway Bundle — EMCrit Project

Quarantine Down Under — Adventure Medic

Dr Millie Wood / Foundation Year 3 / Perth, Western Australia How does one survive without fresh air for 14 days? Dr Wood recounts her experiences of quarantine between the four walls of her hotel room in Perth, Australia back in the summer of 2020. The year is 2020. To obtain the luxury of a… QuarantineContinue reading “Quarantine Down Under — Adventure Medic”

Supraglottic airway devices — Don’t Forget the Bubbles

Cite this article as: Jessica Rogers. Supraglottic airway devices, Don’t Forget the Bubbles, 2021. Available at:https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.32780 Endotracheal intubation (ETI) in children is thankfully rare and our first pass success rate could definitely do with some improvement. It is difficult to compare the efficacy of various advanced airway techniques in children. There are ethical implications, of… SupraglotticContinue reading “Supraglottic airway devices — Don’t Forget the Bubbles”

Efficacy of ketamine for initial control of acute agitation in the emergency department: A randomized study – The American Journal of Emergency Medicine

Efficacy of ketamine for initial control of acute agitation in the emergency department: A randomized study – The American Journal of Emergency Medicine — Read on http://www.ajemjournal.com/article/S0735-6757(20)30241-2/pdf

Own the Hamilton T1 — EmergencyPedia

The Hamilton T1 Switching from the Oxylog 3000+ (or similar) to the Hamilton T1 seems to be a ubiquitous challenge in many ICUs, EDs and retrieval services across Australia and beyond We respectfully “copy” and adapt LIFTL’s prior blog for 2021 and the Hamilton – CLICK HERE From 2015 – Own the OXYLOG 3000 For […]Continue reading “Own the Hamilton T1 — EmergencyPedia”

Ultrasound Guided Peripheral Vascular Access — Don’t Forget the Bubbles

Cite this article as: Trent Calcutt. Ultrasound Guided Peripheral Vascular Access, Don’t Forget the Bubbles, 2021. Available at:https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.23253 One of my favourite things in paediatrics is the expanding role of ultrasound guided vascular access. When I started as a paediatric registrar, I’d just finished an adult ICU term where I’d become spent a majority of… UltrasoundContinue reading “Ultrasound Guided Peripheral Vascular Access — Don’t Forget the Bubbles”

Pacific Island Playlist 5: Mental Health | Coda Change

From #SMACC2019, the incredible Jess Morton speaks candidly about her own mental health journey. Eliminating the stigma that surrounds mental health starts with us as healthcare professionals. — Read on codachange.org/coda-change/pacific-island-playlist-5-mental-health/

Joint Statement – COVID vaccination only pathway to more normal life | Australian Medical Association

The AMA and members of the Council of Presidents of Medical Colleges (CPMC) have said getting the COVID vaccination is the only pathway back to a more normal life.   — Read on ama.com.au/media/joint-statement-covid-vaccination-only-pathway-more-normal-life

Effect of the use of an endotracheal tube and stylet versus an endotracheal tube alone on first-attempt intubation success: a multicentre, randomised clinical trial in 999 patients

Effect of the use of an endotracheal tube and stylet versus an endotracheal tube alone on first-attempt intubation success: a multicentre, randomised clinical trial in 999 patients — Read on link.springer.com/epdf/10.1007/s00134-021-06417-y

How a doctor’s suicide broke the silence – Conversations – ABC Radio

Gastroenterologist Andrew Bryant’s active, social and positive exterior gave no hint of the depression he was suffering. Days after his tragic death his wife Susan wrote an email making it clear she and her adult children were not ashamed of the way he died. It went viral (CW: suicide) — Read on http://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/conversations/doctors-suicide-susan-bryant-andrew-bryant/13335414