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Posts from the ‘Prehospital medicine’ Category

The Remote Bad Stuff — The Collective

Last time Jodie Martin, Flight Nurse extraordinaire dropped by she shared one of our most popular posts ever. Jodie returns with a little on the Top End experience of sepsis. Time for a look at some remote medicine again. CareFlight provides the aeromedical service for the top half of the Northern Territory (NT) in Australia. […]

via The Remote Bad Stuff — The Collective

A world of new threats — Intensive Care Network

Terrorism is a new threat for pre hospital care specialists. Even if you’re experienced in trauma patient management expect surprises if you are involved in a multi site multi modal terrorist attack The post A world of new threats appeared first on Intensive Care Network.

via A world of new threats — Intensive Care Network

FIELD AMPUTATIONS —

A paper in EMJ compares various methods for performing field amputations. I can’t say I ever had to do one myself. However, some of the people I work with have performed amputations on rapidly deteriorating entrapped trauma victims. Most them have relied on the … Continue reading →

via FIELD AMPUTATIONS —

How to do Prehospital Research — Intensive Care Network

How can you build evidence by combining academic activity with pre-hospital critical care practice. The post How to do Prehospital Research appeared first on Intensive Care Network.

via How to do Prehospital Research — Intensive Care Network

When PHARM meets the Farm: Rescue, Resuscitation & Retrieval in the Agrarian Environment — Intensive Care Network

Farmers work long hours, in isolated areas using older machinery. When EMS is called to the scene of an agricultural accident -Expect the worst ( you wont be disappointed). The post When PHARM meets the Farm: Rescue, Resuscitation & Retrieval in the Agrarian Environment appeared first on Intensive Care Network.

via When PHARM meets the Farm: Rescue, Resuscitation & Retrieval in the Agrarian Environment — Intensive Care Network

Getting to the Start Line — The Collective

We can debate the value of this advanced team model vs that advanced team model. We can debate videolaryngoscopy vs direct laryngoscopy for days. People do. Its all chump change compared to the real challenge. Getting that team where they need to be. Dr Alan Garner and Dr Andrew Weatherall have a bit reviewing a paper […]

via Getting to the Start Line — The Collective

Its only a drop in the Olympic Ocean

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The Prehospital Olympics

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Are you Scandinavian speaking?

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Tactical Medicine in the Civilian Setting – The Second Bit — The Collective

We’re back with the second post in a series on tactical medicine in the civilian setting, written again by one of our CNCs Mel Brown. We’re going back to back with these ones (you can find part one here) though you might have to wait a little for part three. The tactical environment is dynamic and can […]

via Tactical Medicine in the Civilian Setting – The Second Bit — The Collective

Philadelphia trial of Scoop & Run !

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Scoop & run or stay & play in 2016

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Academic Study Options in Prehospital & Retrieval Medicine

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Thinking Tactically – Part 1 — The Collective

With events such Dallas and its ongoing grief, it is a little timely to introduce a new series on tactical medicine in the civilian setting. We also welcome a new contributor to the site: Melanie Brown. As one of CareFlight’s Clinical Nurse Consultants for Medical Education and with a background as an Emergency Nurse and independent practitioner […]

via Thinking Tactically – Part 1 — The Collective

Tim rants about Paramedic RSI – Its worth a read

A nice little paper caught my eye in this months Emergency Medicine Australasia. Entitled “Review of therapeutic agents employed by an Australian aeromedical prehospital and retrieval service” this is a really simple paper; basically an audit of the medications carried and used over a 12 month period by the Sydney HEMS service. Everyone likes playing with…

via On simple research and the gift of sharing… — KI Doc